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Cheap Vegan Pasta Fagioli Recipe
This is a recipe for delicious pasta fagioli that you can make cheap and easily. It’s quick, painless, and delicious!
What you need:
Cooking oil
1/2 chopped onion
2-3 cloves garlic
2 stalks chopped celery
4 chopped Tomatoes (or 1 Can chopped tomatoes is ok)
Can of White Beans (this has garbanzo and white)
1 Chopped Carrot
Veggie Bouillon Cube
1 cup chopped Spinach
5-6 leaves of Basil
Oregano to taste (optional)
1 stick of rosemary (optional)
2-3 tbsp Nutritional Yeast
Salt to taste
Penne or similar noodle
-Boil pasta in a separate pot until very al dente.
-Chop onions and garlic to preference and sauté until onions clear
-Add cut celery and carrots until the celery clears a little too and throw in your bouillon cube
-Cover contents with water and let boil. 
-Add spinach and herbs and cover all that with water.
-Add nutritional yeast (try not to heat the soup any more after adding nutritional yeast)
-Once everything is cooked serve your soup with pasta. Do not store soup and pasta together or the pasta will become mushy.

Cheap Vegan Pasta Fagioli Recipe

This is a recipe for delicious pasta fagioli that you can make cheap and easily. It’s quick, painless, and delicious!

What you need:

  • Cooking oil
  • 1/2 chopped onion
  • 2-3 cloves garlic
  • 2 stalks chopped celery
  • 4 chopped Tomatoes (or 1 Can chopped tomatoes is ok)
  • Can of White Beans (this has garbanzo and white)
  • 1 Chopped Carrot
  • Veggie Bouillon Cube
  • 1 cup chopped Spinach
  • 5-6 leaves of Basil
  • Oregano to taste (optional)
  • 1 stick of rosemary (optional)
  • 2-3 tbsp Nutritional Yeast
  • Salt to taste
  • Penne or similar noodle
  1. -Boil pasta in a separate pot until very al dente.
  2. -Chop onions and garlic to preference and sauté until onions clear
  3. -Add cut celery and carrots until the celery clears a little too and throw in your bouillon cube
  4. -Cover contents with water and let boil. 
  5. -Add spinach and herbs and cover all that with water.
  6. -Add nutritional yeast (try not to heat the soup any more after adding nutritional yeast)
  7. -Once everything is cooked serve your soup with pasta.
    Do not store soup and pasta together or the pasta will become mushy.
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Cooking for the Work-Week!

No more excuses for spending $50 a week on take-out! It’s time to work for your food and cook for yourself in advance.

I just started a new job and I’m learning that it really is hard to find the time to cook delicious/nutritious/cheap meals every single day, 3 meals a day. It’s so much easier to just get take out during your lunch break or on your drive to or from work. However the Cheap Vegan can not survive financially by eating out multiple meals a week. To keep your budget low you have to depend on some home cookin’.

Which is why we need to start cooking meals in advance! 

Here are some tips on cooking your weeks’ meals on the weekend:

  1. Cook meals that won’t get boring.
    Since you probably won’t be cooking too many more meals for yourself during the work week, try to think of food that you are always excited to eat. You don’t want to cook a giant batch of something just to get sick of it by Wednesday.
  2. Versatility. 
    Both nutritional and functional versatility is important when deciding what to cook. You want to make sure that you aren’t only eating one type of vegetable and that your meal can be altered to keep it interesting. A great example is vegetable stew (pictured above). It has a variety of different veggies and can be served alongside potatoes, kale, rice, or hearty bread.
    Another option is making a few sides that you can combine in different ways to create different meals. A batch of rice, a batch of beans, and a few vegetable choices can give you lots of variety depending what sauces and spices you add when you heat it up.
  3. Won’t Spoil.
    While cucumber/avocado sushi might sound delicious, chances are it’s going to start browning by Wednesday or Thursday. Try to think of recipes that will stay appetizing throughout the week. Tip: foods that stew into themselves are a good starting point.
    (ex: soup, beans, tomato sauce)
     
  4. Work Friendly.
    Since you are bringing this to work and will probably have to be around other people, try not to bring overly pungent foods or foods that are hard to transport. 
  5. Think Big!
    The bigger the batch you make over the weekend, the less you have to do during the week. Think of recipes that you can make in large quantities without too much effort. Soups or a chopped salad are great choices.

Meal Ideas:

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#Howto turn your vegetable soup into a #vegan pot pie!

#cheapvegan #potpie #homecookin #homemade #vegetablesoup #vegetarian #easy #bisquick #biscuits #baking #recipe #recipes #fromscratch

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#Howto make (leftover) vegetable soup!

Look for more soup tips in the www.cheapvegan.com archive! (Search “soup”)

#cheapvegan #vegan #soup #vegetablesoup #leftovers #sick #sickday #health #healthy #slowcook #veggies #soup #homemade #fall #cabbage #sopa #recipe #recipes #easy #athome

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I’ve had this article on the back burner for a while now, but because ramen noodles are so bad for you I haven’t wanted to write it. So this is an important note: YOU SHOULD AVOID EATING INSTANT RAMENIt’s bad for you. The noodles are deep-fried and the mix is full of fat, sodium and MSGs. This is NOT a health food by any stretch of the imagination.
But, if you are gonna eat it…
Here’s How to Dress Up Your Ramen Noodles
 Add veggies. Your noodle/veggie ratio should definitely higher on the vegetable side to at least try to get some nutrients out of your empty calorie meal. I like to use frozen vegetables to save money and for quick prep time. (see recipe ideas below)
Avoid the flavor packet.The only vegan 20cent ramen I know of is Oriental flavor Top Ramen. Feel free to buy this but avoid using the flavor packet as much as possible. Try using onions, garlic, ginger, soy sauce, bouillon, or any other flavor boosters instead of the high-sodium flavoring included. 
Remember a serving is 1/2 the package.I know how easy it is to eat a whole brick of ramen, but remember that on the back it says that a serving is 1/2 of the package. If you’re adding veggies you won’t need as many noodles anyway.
Eat ramen in moderation.Again, ramen is a junk food just as unhealthy as potato chips. Make sure that ramen is your short on time, bottom of your bank account fall back, not your first choice.
Ramen Recipe Ideas
Vegetable Soup Just follow the regular ramen instructions on the back and add your favorite frozen or fresh veggies! Substitute the flavor packet with a bouillon cube or soy sauce.
Ramen Lo Mein (photo above)Chop onion and garlic and stir fry until clear. Add any frozen/fresh veggies of your choice. In mine I used peppers, broccoli, cabbage, peas, spinach, and carrots. Add soy sauce to your liking, feel free to try other flavors like ginger, plum sauce, peanut sauce, or spicy red pepper flakes. Boil noodles then drain. evaporate water off of noodles in separate pan on low heat with a touch of olive oil to keep from sticking, then mix with veggies.
Ramen Pasta SaladAdd chopped cabbage, carrots, red pepper, and sliced almonds to a cold bowl of cooked and drained instant ramen. Mix with italian dressing/balsalmic/asian-style dressing of your choice. Serve chilled.

I’ve had this article on the back burner for a while now, but because ramen noodles are so bad for you I haven’t wanted to write it.
So this is an important note: YOU SHOULD AVOID EATING INSTANT RAMEN
It’s bad for you. The noodles are deep-fried and the mix is full of fat, sodium and MSGs. This is NOT a health food by any stretch of the imagination.

But, if you are gonna eat it…

Here’s How to Dress Up Your Ramen Noodles

  1.  Add veggies. 
    Your noodle/veggie ratio should definitely higher on the vegetable side to at least try to get some nutrients out of your empty calorie meal. I like to use frozen vegetables to save money and for quick prep time. (see recipe ideas below)
  2. Avoid the flavor packet.
    The only vegan 20cent ramen I know of is Oriental flavor Top Ramen. Feel free to buy this but avoid using the flavor packet as much as possible. Try using onions, garlic, ginger, soy sauce, bouillon, or any other flavor boosters instead of the high-sodium flavoring included. 
  3. Remember a serving is 1/2 the package.
    I know how easy it is to eat a whole brick of ramen, but remember that on the back it says that a serving is 1/2 of the package. If you’re adding veggies you won’t need as many noodles anyway.
  4. Eat ramen in moderation.
    Again, ramen is a junk food just as unhealthy as potato chips. Make sure that ramen is your short on time, bottom of your bank account fall back, not your first choice.

Ramen Recipe Ideas

  • Vegetable Soup 
    Just follow the regular ramen instructions on the back and add your favorite frozen or fresh veggies! Substitute the flavor packet with a bouillon cube or soy sauce.
  • Ramen Lo Mein (photo above)
    Chop onion and garlic and stir fry until clear. Add any frozen/fresh veggies of your choice. In mine I used peppers, broccoli, cabbage, peas, spinach, and carrots. Add soy sauce to your liking, feel free to try other flavors like ginger, plum sauce, peanut sauce, or spicy red pepper flakes. 
    Boil noodles then drain. evaporate water off of noodles in separate pan on low heat with a touch of olive oil to keep from sticking, then mix with veggies.
  • Ramen Pasta Salad
    Add chopped cabbage, carrots, red pepper, and sliced almonds to a cold bowl of cooked and drained instant ramen. Mix with italian dressing/balsalmic/asian-style dressing of your choice. Serve chilled.
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Cheap and Easy Homemade Salsa!
Because People Like to say, “Salsa

Buying salsa kills me. For a simple mix of onion and tomato it costs $3.50. This measly 15.5oz jar lasts about 10 minutes, 5 minutes if I share it with friends. Plus! That’s not even the good salsa! I’m just talking the run of the mill Tostido nonsense you get at the 711!

I never thought I could master the art of salsa so I begrudgingly complied to the salsa injustice I faced. That is until I went to Spain. In Spain, Mexican food basically does not exist. I know, I know, they’re Spanish! Shouldn’t they eat exactly like Mexicans?! No. Unfortunately, there is nothing about Spanish cuisine that even comes close to Mexican.

Like all globalized nations, they do have Mexican food. But frankly, it’s awful and it costs double the price of the same products you’d find in the states. So my little 15.5oz Tostido jar of salsa turned into an even smaller jar for $2 more and an even worse flavor!

No thankyou.

So I decided it was time to take matters into my own hands and my little kitchen in Barcelona was the birth place of Cheap Vegan Salsa. It has been a while since I talked salsa on here so I decided to re-share my recipe with you.

But first, recognize that no two home made salsas are identical and you can be as creative with this recipe as you like. Want to add Garlic? Mango? Black beans? Jalepenos?! Go for it! I’m providing the cheapest salsa building blocks, it’s up to you to make it your own.

Cheap Vegan Salsa

  • 1 large can crushed tomatoes - $1 
    (fresh tomatoes blended are even better)
  • 1 green bell pepper - $0.35
  • 1/2 large onion - $0.20
  • 1/4 lime - $0.10
  • 5-10 cilantro leaves - free from your herb garden
    (a $3 cilantro plant is an investment, it will last as long as you water it) 
  • salt
  1. Pour crushed tomatoes into a jar.
  2. Dice the onion and green pepper and put them in the jar as well.
  3. Rip up the cilantro leaves and throw them in too.
  4. Squeeze lime on top.
  5. Salt to taste, I think the salsa in this photo probably had 1-2 tsp
  6. Let salsa sit in fridge overnight.
    You can eat it right away but it will improve the longer it sits.

There you have it! 2 and a half times the salsa for under $2!

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What do Vegans Eat Anyway? (Part II)

Having a vegan guest over? Maybe you’re just thinking of trying to eat healthier for the new year, or even go Vegan! But knowing where to start can be tricky, especially when you don’t know what is and isn’t vegan yet. So here’s a mini mock-menu of some real life Cheap Vegan staples I eat on the regular.

Breakfast: 
  1. Oatmeal w/ natural peanut butter, chopped apples, banana, and cinnamon, topped with granola (for crunch and sweet flavor)
  2. Granola with as many different fruits as I have/want and almond milk. Sometimes a scoop of natural peanut butter.
  3. Natural Almond/Peanut butter and banana sandwiches w/some cinnamon (sometimes I’ll also do strawberry, peach, apple or grape slices, depending on what I have) 
  4. Pancakes - I’ll just use the Bisquick flour, add some oatmeal to the batter to pretend it’s healthy. 
    Then substitute milk with soy/almond milk and eggs with Energ-G Egg Replacer or Oil as an egg substitute. 
    Top with fruit and natural peanut butter 
  5. Smoothies/fruit salad (they also sell vegan yogurt for about $1 at whole foods)
Lunch: 
  1. Veggie Burger on Ezekiel bread with avocado, tomato, lettuce and Jalepeno.
    (I like the veggie burgers that are made of veggies rather than say the boca burgers that are mostly soy/wheat protein to replicate meat)
  2. Raw Chopped Salad** (This is my FAVORITE go-to when I don’t know what to eat, good for the work week)
  3. Soup - generally I just take anything I have and dice it or throw it in a blender then slow cook it when I know I’ll be home the whole day. Then I have soup for the rest of the week, same as the Chopped Salad. 
  4. Taco Salad - instead of meat, sub beans, instead of cheese sub nutritional yeast or Daiya “Cheese” (Daiya is tapioca based faux-cheese, it’s pretty tasty but not that healthy)
  5. Hummus Sandwich w/tomato, onion, lettuce, avocado, cucumber, sprouts, black olives, whatever looks good.
Dinner:
  1. Pasta w/Tomato Sauce and Beans 
  2. Red Beans and Brown Rice w/Greens
  3. Stir Fry and Brown Rice or Quinoa
  4. Various Veggie Casseroles - I think baking is the best and tastiest way to cook so I’ll make casseroles out of anything. Vegan Shepherds Pie, Veggie Pot Pie, Mediterranean Veggies with White Beans, Artichoke, Zucchini, tomato, garlic, etc. 
  5.  Mexican Quinoa, or nachos, or burritos, or tacos…..
    (Quinoa recipes: http://cheapveg.tumblr.com/search/quinoa)
Snacks
  1. Nuts/Trail Mix
  2. Sun-dried tomato on baguette
  3. Apple and Peanut Butter w/cinnamon 
  4. Olives
  5. Veggies and Hummus
Desserts
  1. Raw Banana Ice Cream** AMAZING 
    I’ll usually add strawberries, blueberries and a scoop of Peanut Butter and Co. Dark Chocolate Dreams, made from peanuts and cocoa, sorta like a healthier fudge. 
  2. Fruit Juice Popsicles
  3. Frozen Fruit - you can also blend frozen fruit to make a sorbet, similar to the banana ice cream method
  4. Various Types of Dark Chocolate (without milk, whey, etc)
  5. Vegan Pastries
    Still not really healthy but better than normal. They sell them pre-made at whole foods or you can make your own 
General Tips on Nutritional Substituting:
  • To cut down on empty carbs and to get extra Calcium, Iron, etc. I try to add green leafy vegetables to my meals and then a smaller portion of grains. (Here’s a link explaining how)
  • I put Nutritional Yeast on basically everything savory for some added B12
  • I put beans or nuts/nut butters in almost everything for Protein 
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Cheap Vegan Left Over Revival Guide to Last Night´s Chinese Food
Have you ever looked at your left over Chinese and just thought, ¨hmm don´t really want to eat this…¨ You probably eat it anyway, but nothing is as good as the fresh Lo Mein you had the night before. But lucky for us there are ways to revive your left overs to the point that they seem like a brand new meal.
Since we are dealing with vegan Chinese food, it´s safe to say the main ingredients of your meal are vegetables and rice (maybe noodles if they´re egg free). So what you´re looking at for Chinese food on day 2 is a stir fry that can bring some pizazz back to your grease soaked brocoli.
The biggest challenge with these left overs is that Chinese food seems to double in moisture overnight to a point where all of the vegetables have all sort of turned the same color… I´m going to try to help you make this appetizing!
Make some extra brown rice. This will help soak up the flavor and give us a base of our meal. You might even have some left over with your main dish.
Get a pan hot and throw on some onions, ginger, and garlic. This combo can accomodate sweet, spicy, or soy saucy tastes.
Next, add the left overs to your pan. Try to simmer off some of the excess water. 
Then we add any fresh veggies that match what was already in the dish. Some staples of most vegan chinese food dishes are cabbage, cashews, brocoli, tofu, carrots, and peas. These are pretty safe places to start.
You´ll need to add some flavor so your fresh ingredients match your left overs, so make sure everything is soaked pretty well. To do this, try to mimic whatever sauce was on there before.SALTY: Hoisin, Teriaki, Soy, even salt or vegetable brothSWEET: Add some fruit like pineapple or orange juice SWEET AND SOUR: try a pineapple, soy sauce and vinegar combo* IF YOU LIKE SPICE: Add some red pepper flakes or sriracha **NOTE: Adding a bad sauce to your stir fry is guaranteed to ruin your meal. Make sure that if you´re experimenting do so in a separate bowl. Then, dip a vegetable from the original left over to taste if it compliments your dish the way you intended. Always add sauces slowly, there´s nothing worse than too much of a good thing.AFRAID OF SCREWING UP THE FLAVOR? If you aren´t a wiz in the kitchen and you really just want to keep this simple, season with the free packets of soy and duck sauce you got with your meal. Maybe add a little red pepper if you´re feeling crazy. If you still seem to have gone a little too far justpour out some of the excess sauce, add some water, and sautee for an extra minute or 2. 
Add your Stirfry to the rice and enjoy your Chinese food´s 2nd life.

Cheap Vegan Left Over Revival Guide to Last Night´s Chinese Food

Have you ever looked at your left over Chinese and just thought, ¨hmm don´t really want to eat this…¨
You probably eat it anyway, but nothing is as good as the fresh Lo Mein you had the night before. But lucky for us there are ways to revive your left overs to the point that they seem like a brand new meal.

Since we are dealing with vegan Chinese food, it´s safe to say the main ingredients of your meal are vegetables and rice (maybe noodles if they´re egg free). So what you´re looking at for Chinese food on day 2 is a stir fry that can bring some pizazz back to your grease soaked brocoli.

The biggest challenge with these left overs is that Chinese food seems to double in moisture overnight to a point where all of the vegetables have all sort of turned the same color… I´m going to try to help you make this appetizing!

  1. Make some extra brown rice. This will help soak up the flavor and give us a base of our meal. You might even have some left over with your main dish.
  2. Get a pan hot and throw on some onions, ginger, and garlic. This combo can accomodate sweet, spicy, or soy saucy tastes.
  3. Next, add the left overs to your pan. Try to simmer off some of the excess water. 
  4. Then we add any fresh veggies that match what was already in the dish. Some staples of most vegan chinese food dishes are cabbage, cashews, brocoli, tofu, carrots, and peas. These are pretty safe places to start.
  5. You´ll need to add some flavor so your fresh ingredients match your left overs, so make sure everything is soaked pretty well. To do this, try to mimic whatever sauce was on there before.
    SALTY: Hoisin, Teriaki, Soy, even salt or vegetable broth
    SWEET: Add some fruit like pineapple or orange juice
    SWEET AND SOUR: try a pineapple, soy sauce and vinegar combo* 
    IF YOU LIKE SPICE: Add some red pepper flakes or sriracha 
    **NOTE: Adding a bad sauce to your stir fry is guaranteed to ruin your meal. Make sure that if you´re experimenting do so in a separate bowl. Then, dip a vegetable from the original left over to taste if it compliments your dish the way you intended. Always add sauces slowly, there´s nothing worse than too much of a good thing.
    AFRAID OF SCREWING UP THE FLAVOR?
     If you aren´t a wiz in the kitchen and you really just want to keep this simple, season with the free packets of soy and duck sauce you got with your meal. Maybe add a little red pepper if you´re feeling crazy. 
    If you still seem to have gone a little too far justpour out some of the excess sauce, add some water, and sautee for an extra minute or 2. 
  6. Add your Stirfry to the rice and enjoy your Chinese food´s 2nd life.
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Tofu RedemptionNow in my last article I know I hated on tofu a little, but like it or not, tofu is a great source of iron and protein. My philosophy as a vegan is to force myself to learn to like everything (healthy) I can eat. Following a vegan diet means that you cut yourself off to a lot of “normal” foods, so it’s harder for people to be as tolerant of a picky vegan. Plus, it’s harder on yourself to be picky. There are less opportunities to get the proper nutrients and gives you even less options when you go out to eat.
While tofu isn’t my favorite food, it can actually be pretty fun to experiment with in the kitchen. Tofu’s unique lack of almost any flavor makes it kind of gross on its own, but also makes it a really easy incorporate into almost any recipe.
You can add tofu to almost anything, savory or sweet. One of my favorites is the ever popular tofu scramble.
The Cheap Vegan Southwest Tofu Scramble(3-4 servings)
In 1st pan:
1 14oz cube tofu
1/4 cup nutritional yeast
1/2 tsp garlic powder
1/2 tsp tumeric (mostly for yellow color)
salt and pepper to taste
In 2nd pan:
1 onion
2 chopped green peppers
5 small red potatoes
3 chopped plum tomatoes
1/2 cup black beans
1 tsp garlic powder
3/4 tsp thyme
2 tsp cumin
1/2 tsp crushed red pepper
sprinkle of chilli powder
In 1st pan:
Pinch off bite size pieces of tofu and put on medium heat. Allow water to evaporate off.
Once the water is mostly gone mix in the nutritional yeast, garlic, salt, pepper, and tumeric.
Leave on low heat stirring occasionally while the other pan is cooking.
In 2nd pan:
Bake, microwave or pan fry potatoes until they are soft, cut in quarters and set aside.
Dice onion and put into pan with about a tablespoon of olive oil. I try to use as little olive oil as possible but enough to get my onions clear.
Once onions have cleared add the green pepper and potatoes.
Once the potatoes and peppers have been evenly coated with the rest of the mixture add tomatoes, black beans, garlic, thyme, cumin, crushed red pepper, and chilli powder.
Combine Pan 1 and 2. Add salt to taste.
Serve in a bowl as a skillet, on bread as a sandwich, or in a burrito. I suggest serving with avocado and salsa on the side.
This recipe incorporates 3 items from our list of iron and protein foods as well nutritional yeast which is a great source of vitamin B12.

Tofu Redemption
Now in my last article I know I hated on tofu a little, but like it or not, tofu is a great source of iron and protein. My philosophy as a vegan is to force myself to learn to like everything (healthy) I can eat. Following a vegan diet means that you cut yourself off to a lot of “normal” foods, so it’s harder for people to be as tolerant of a picky vegan. Plus, it’s harder on yourself to be picky. There are less opportunities to get the proper nutrients and gives you even less options when you go out to eat.

While tofu isn’t my favorite food, it can actually be pretty fun to experiment with in the kitchen. Tofu’s unique lack of almost any flavor makes it kind of gross on its own, but also makes it a really easy incorporate into almost any recipe.

You can add tofu to almost anything, savory or sweet. One of my favorites is the ever popular tofu scramble.

The Cheap Vegan Southwest Tofu Scramble
(3-4 servings)

In 1st pan:

  • 1 14oz cube tofu
  • 1/4 cup nutritional yeast
  • 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/2 tsp tumeric (mostly for yellow color)
  • salt and pepper to taste

In 2nd pan:

  • 1 onion
  • 2 chopped green peppers
  • 5 small red potatoes
  • 3 chopped plum tomatoes
  • 1/2 cup black beans
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 3/4 tsp thyme
  • 2 tsp cumin
  • 1/2 tsp crushed red pepper
  • sprinkle of chilli powder

In 1st pan:

  1. Pinch off bite size pieces of tofu and put on medium heat. Allow water to evaporate off.
  2. Once the water is mostly gone mix in the nutritional yeast, garlic, salt, pepper, and tumeric.
  3. Leave on low heat stirring occasionally while the other pan is cooking.

In 2nd pan:

  1. Bake, microwave or pan fry potatoes until they are soft, cut in quarters and set aside.
  2. Dice onion and put into pan with about a tablespoon of olive oil. I try to use as little olive oil as possible but enough to get my onions clear.
  3. Once onions have cleared add the green pepper and potatoes.
  4. Once the potatoes and peppers have been evenly coated with the rest of the mixture add tomatoes, black beans, garlic, thyme, cumin, crushed red pepper, and chilli powder.
  5. Combine Pan 1 and 2. Add salt to taste.
  6. Serve in a bowl as a skillet, on bread as a sandwich, or in a burrito. I suggest serving with avocado and salsa on the side.

This recipe incorporates 3 items from our list of iron and protein foods as well nutritional yeast which is a great source of vitamin B12.

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Mexiquinoawesome! (rice substitute)
1 cup quinoa
1/2 vegetable bouillon cube
1/2 onion
generous amount of garlic powder
1 yellow or green pepper
1 tomato
1 can black beans
1/2 tsp chilli powder
1/3 tsp cumin
2 leafs chopped Romaine or Kale
Serve with Cholula hot sauce
Soak quinoa for 5 minutes. Add quinoa and bouillon cube to 1 and 1/2 cup water and bring to boil for 15 minutes in tight lid. Turn heat off and let steam until soft.
Add onion, garlic powder, and a splash of olive oil in a large deep frying pan.
Once onion clears, add the rest of the ingredients in order except for Kale/Romaine.
Serve on a bed of Romaine lettuce or Kale (see article here)

Mexiquinoawesome!
(rice substitute)

  • 1 cup quinoa
  • 1/2 vegetable bouillon cube
  • 1/2 onion
  • generous amount of garlic powder
  • 1 yellow or green pepper
  • 1 tomato
  • 1 can black beans
  • 1/2 tsp chilli powder
  • 1/3 tsp cumin
  • 2 leafs chopped Romaine or Kale
  • Serve with Cholula hot sauce
  1. Soak quinoa for 5 minutes. Add quinoa and bouillon cube to 1 and 1/2 cup water and bring to boil for 15 minutes in tight lid. Turn heat off and let steam until soft.
  2. Add onion, garlic powder, and a splash of olive oil in a large deep frying pan.
  3. Once onion clears, add the rest of the ingredients in order except for Kale/Romaine.
  4. Serve on a bed of Romaine lettuce or Kale (see article here)